Students & Collaborators

Students

Sienna Ablorh (she/her/hers)

Class and Major: Class of 2021 – Psychology and History double major, with a concentration in Africana Studies

I joined the Educational Equity Lab because I wanted more experience in designing and conducting psychological experiments, especially to examine how the pandemic differentially affected students from different backgrounds, and how we as a society can take steps to combat these inequities.

A psychological finding that has stuck with me is that maltreated children have less secure relationships with parents, show less empathy, have lower self-esteem, have more conflicts with peers, and have more difficulties with academic work in elementary school (see Siegler, DeLoach, & Eisenberg, 2011, p. 370). I think this is interesting because it seems like these behaviors are seen as reasons to punish students, versus as red flags for maltreatment that schools should watch out for and attempt to intervene on.

Sabrina Ramos (she/her/hers)

Class and Major: Class of 2022 – Psychology major with a minor in Anthropology

I joined the Educational Equity Lab because while working with young individuals who live at a program rather than with their families, I saw how their education has been impacted by their living conditions. I therefore wanted to gain hands on research experience studying youth development and how external factors influence their learning environment, the level of education, and the quality of education received.

A psychological finding that has stuck with me is the benefits of bilingualism on slowing down the deterioration of the brain. Specifically, bilingual individuals have more brain flexibility since they switch between languages frequently, and this flexibility delays symptoms of Alzheimer’s by 5 years and dementia by 4 years (Craik, Bialystok, & Freedman, 2010). This is interesting to me since Alzheimer’s runs in my family, and since we are bilingual, this is something I consider as we face the challenges of the disease.

Juliana Tronsky (she/her/hers)

Class and Major: Class of 2022 – Psychology major with a minor in Spanish

I joined the Educational Equity Lab because I believe the interventions we are working on have the potential to impact real people and cause positive change in the world.

A psychological finding that has stuck with me is that when people are shown images of homeless people, a disgust response is evoked, and they show a lack of activity in the medial prefrontal cortex, which allows us to recognize other people as fellow human beings (Fiske, Cuddy, Glick, & Xu, 2002; Harris & Fiske, 2006). This lack of reaction means that the homeless are dehumanized, and may contribute to the lack of support for policies to aid them. This suggests that the homeless are not only unsupported in our society, but actively thought of as less human, which may help explain support for policies like anti-homeless architecture that are designed to keep these people out of sight and out of mind.


Lab Mascot

Cole

Class: 2019 (i.e., he’s 2)

Major: General cuteness/mayhem

Joined the Educational Equity Lab because the Lab Director had treats.

A psychological finding that has stuck with me is that pets have positive effects on psychological well-being, including the ability to stave off negativity caused by social rejection (McConnell et al., 2011, 2017, 2019).






Collaborators

David Miele, Ph.D., Department of Applied, Developmental, and Educational Psychology, Boston College

Mesmin Destin, Ph.D., Department of Psychology and School of Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University

Gregory Walton, Ph.D, Department of Psychology, Stanford University

Carol Dweck, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Stanford University

Sidney May, M.A., Department of Applied, Developmental, and Educational Psychology, Boston College

Meghan Coughlan, M.A., Department of Applied, Developmental, and Educational Psychology, Boston College

Marina Vasilyeva, Ph.D., Department of Applied, Developmental, and Educational Psychology, Boston College

Daniel Molden, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Northwestern University

Kevin Binning, Ph.D., Department of Psychology and Learning Research and Development Center, University of Pittsburgh